Slim your bin with the Rubbish Diet

Would you like a quick and easy way to reduce the amount of waste in your bin? Then sign up to the Rubbish Diet and get tips and support from a whole online community of Rubbish Dieters. Within a month, you should be enjoying a lighter bin and less hassle – and you might even make some savings.

The Rubbish Diet has the broader aim of shrinking the waste train that leaves London six days a week.  It is made up of 26 carriages holding 78 containers of household waste from just six London boroughs: Brent, Ealing, Harrow, Hillingdon, Hounslow and Richmond.  The train’s contents go straight to landfill here in the UK. It’s reckoned that about 67% of its contents could have been recycled first.

The Rubbish Diet is a simple two-step programme: First, you’re asked to check whether you can recycle one more thing and to share your own ideas for avoiding waste. The second step is about making the most of your food.

The programme is tailored to your area and comes in the form of handy emails with tips, links and information about how to get started. Most participants reduce their waste by up to 70%.

Sign up for the Rubbish Diet at http://challenge.therubbishdiet.org.uk/; further information is available at http://www.therubbishdiet.org.uk/wastetrain/ and https://www.facebook.com/westlondonrubbishdiet.

October Meeting

Brentford Recycling Action Group
Minutes of Meeting held in the Toll House, Brentford Lock
Brentford Dock
on Tuesday 7 October 2014

Attending: Patti Horsnell, Hugh Picton, Rukmini West, Douglas Benford, Virginia Fassnidge, Catharine Browne, Wendy Mackenzie, Kath Richardson, Louisa Perkins, LBH, Adam Paul, The Rubbish Diet, Sam Thomas, Canal and River Trust. Continue reading

Waste-reduction event in Southall Oct. 16, with film, tips, discussion and more

Ealing Council and HelpLink are screening a short animated film, The Story of Stuff, this Thursday evening, 16 October, at the Dominion Centre in Southall.

The film, which is suitable for all ages, takes a light approach to showing how to generate less waste and save money.

In addition to the film there will be upcycling demos, discussion, free food and drink, opportunities to engage with local councillors, and more.

The event is free and takes place at the Dominion Centre, 112 The Green, Southall UB2 4BQ. Doors open at 7.30pm.

You can learn more by visiting: http://www.southalltransition.org /events

Dutch environmental group tackles food waste with ‘doggy bag’ initiative

A Dutch environmental group, Natuur & Milieu, has launched a campaign to persuade restaurant patrons to take home their uneaten food and thereby reduce food waste. Natuur & Milieu has distributed 50,000 doggy bags, accompanied by a starter pack, free to restaurants to encourage their participation in the campaign. The doggy bags were developed with input from catering staff, who were asked what kind of container they preferred.

Restaurant patrons who want to take food home can let their waiter know by means of a Boomerang card, which is available free of charge in many restaurants. The cards come in a number of versions, with messages including “A compliment to the chef” and “I always fancy something tasty in the evening”.Milieuclub wil taboe doggybag doorbreken

Natuur & Milieu said that the Dutch catering industry wastes 50,000 tonnes of food annually, the equivalent of 77 million hot meals.

Before launching the campaign, Natuur & Milieu carried out a survey on food waste, which found that 78% of participants said they hated wasting food, but that 80% of restaurant-goers never take home leftover food. Respondents cited embarrassment (52%) and lack of awareness (55%) as the major reasons for not asking for a doggy bag.

Natuur & Milieu’s partners in the campaign are packaging specialist Depa Disposables, NGO Oxfam Novib and banking group Rabobank.

For more information, see (in Dutch) http://www.doggybag.nu.

California legislature votes to ban disposable plastic bags

The U.S. state of California has passed a bill banning the use of disposable plastic bags in grocery stores, pharmacies, off-licences and other businesses throughout the state. The bill, which needs to be signed by the governor before becoming law, would usher in the first statewide ban of this type in the United States, starting July 1, 2015. A number of U.S. cities have already banned disposable plastic bags in shops, including San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland, Oregon. The law would allow the sale of reusable plastic bags at grocery stores.