A Plastic Planet rolls out first-ever ‘plastic free’ Trust Mark

Environmental campaign group A Plastic Planet has launched the world’s first ‘plastic free’ Trust Mark, to let shoppers know which food and drink products have been packaged without plastic.

Early adopters of the Trust Mark include UK supermarket giant Iceland, Dutch retailer Ekoplaza and tea brand Teapigs.

For further information, click here.

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Morrisons customers can now bring their own containers when buying meat or fish

Supermarket chain Morrisons has announced it will allow customers to use their own containers for meat and fish from the Morrisons’ Market Street Butcher and Fishmonger counters as from this month.

The new policy is part of a number of measures the Bradford-based supermarket is taking to reduce plastic pollution, in addition to committing to make all its own-brand plastic packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by no later than 2025.

For further information, click here.

Leading retailers and manufacturers sign up to the UK Plastics Pact

More than 40 companies have signed up to a pact that aims to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years.

The firms, which include Coca-Cola and Asda, have promised to honour a number of pledges that include eliminating single-use packaging through better design.

They have joined the government, trade associations and campaigners to form the UK Plastics PactContinue reading

Calling all green-fingered residents: Air Quality Brentford needs you at Brentford station

Air Quality Brentford is doing another planting project north of Brentford Station on Sunday, 25 March, at 11am (remember clocks will have gone forward one hour). The group has been given some large containers to plant in to and will be building on the bulb planting project on the slope. If you are able to help, it would be great to see you.

Zero-waste shopping

Zero-waste shopping can mean a number of things: buying articles designed to last, eg, good-quality T-shirts that last for years rather than cheap ones that lose their shape after a couple of washes; buying secondhand from charity shops, eBay, etc, or obtaining goods from Freecycle, Freegle, etc; and repairing or repurposing items.

It can also mean using your own containers when you buy unpackaged groceries. Shops like As Nature Intended offer the opportunity to refill washing-up and laundry liquid bottles, and many Lush products are unpackaged.

As for food, loose fruit and veg are readily available from shops of all kinds, but it isn’t all that easy to buy other kinds of products in loose form. The Zero Waster has a comprehensive list of places where you can do just that, as well as much other useful information about avoiding waste.

The Source Bulk Foods has just opened in Chiswick, at 24 Turnham Green Terrace. It has a range of about 450 products, including flour, rice, cereals, honey, oil and vinegar, as well as cleaning and personal care products. You can buy whatever quantity you need and fill your own containers. Have a look next time you are in the area.

Tips for using less plastic. No. 1

Reducing the amount of plastic you use needn’t be hard. With this post, BRAG kicks off a series of tips on how to do this, one tip at a time, and in no particular order of priority, so you can gradually introduce plastic-reducing changes into your routine. And we’d love to hear your tips, too.

Tip no. 1: Carry cutlery in your bag, and refuse offers of plastic knives, forks and spoons in food outlets. If you work in an office, keep a plate, bowl, glass and cutlery in your desk.